A contrast of two settings in the great gatsby a novel by f scott fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

Tom is more aggressive than the idealistic Gatsby, so he gets the girl. He can become rich, but he cannot become "old money.

In The Great Gatsby, why is the setting important?

Daisy has a bruise on her finger from Tom, and he clearly assumes she will just take whatever treatment he gives her because she always has.

But the city is important in other ways, too; Tom only interacts with his mistress in the city, and Gatsby only sees Meyer Wolfsheim there.

It is clear in chapter one that Daisy--and everyone else--is quite aware that he is currently having an affair, though she does not know it is with Myrtle. Roaring Twenties We open in the early s: He saw senseless death in the war, and he sees it again in New York.

It also symbolizes the social strata in this society. Despite all his money, Gatsby lives in West Egg, suggesting that he has not been able to complete his transformation into a member of the social elite.

Both men claim to love Daisy. They both use the city to hide their goings-on from the people they value on Long Island. Daisy can go to West Egg, the less fashionable of the two Eggs, to conduct her affair with Gatsby because it seems so far away from any place that her husband would willingly go himself.

Like Nick Carraway, Tom Buchanan and Jay Gatsby commute into the city for their respective lines of work, while the women are left behind.

It is also important to the plot of the novel; Nick came "East" because he returned from the Great War a bit disillusioned with his home and in need of some place new. The Buchanans married because they both came from rich families and it was the expected thing for them to do. Not even the effeminate swank of his riding clothes could hide the enormous power of that body--he seemed to fill those glistening boots until he strained the top lacing, and you could see a great pack of muscle shifting when his shoulder moved under his thin coat.

Tom demonstrates his love for Daisy by having a series of affairs with other women, even on his honeymoon; he does not work very hard to keep these affairs private, which is why the Buchanans move so much. He buys a house across the peninsula from her and throws lavish parties in the misplaced hope that Daisy will one day appear.

This geographical divide ends up being a gender distinction, too. Daisy can go to West Egg, the less fashionable of the two Rich people do like to spend their time drawing subtle distinctions between types of wealth.

Physically, Tom is a much more imposing figure, full of violence and aggression: Finally, Nick says that he "came back [from the war] restless," looking for more than what the Midwest offered him. It was a body capable of enormous leverage--a cruel body.

Compare and contrast Gatsby and Tom in F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel The Great Gatsby.

Daisy loved Tom once, but she loves Gatsby more. We say "effectively," because plenty of people manufactured, sold, and drank alcohol anyway—like all the characters in the book, who seem to be constantly drunk, and Gatsby, who made his money bootlegging: He yearns for her and longs for her, but he has created a romanticized version of her which dilutes his original, pure love for Daisy.

While Tom displays blatant racist views in his conversations, Gatsby is not concerned by such matters. Not surprisingly, Tom is aggressive and opinionated when he speaks in social settings, and Gatsby is rather awkward and inept in them. The second contrast is between the city scenes and the suburban ones.

Scott Fitzgerald, and Tom Buchanan is his nemesis throughout the novel. He does not see her for five years, and in that time Gatsby works feverishly to acquire the things which he believes Daisy needs in order to be with him. Ironically, the place he thought might help him move on actually turns out to be the place that reinforces the disillusionment he now feels with the world.

Gatsby, on the other hand, has a more refined wardrobe and displays an entirely different body language than Tom. In the East, he learns how "careless" people can be with one another. Their attitudes are also quite different.

Both men claim to love Daisy, which is the cause of their dissension. Myrtle and George Wilson inhabit a totally different setting: Two shining arrogant eyes had established dominance over his face and gave him the appearance of always leaning aggressively forward.The novel has two important settings, and what is most important about them is the vivid contrast between the two.

Jay Gatsby's house is a fantasy playground, more of an "amusement park" for. In a novel, setting is often used to set a mood and influence the way which characters behave. In F. Scott Fitzgerald's, The Great Gatsby, readers are introduced to fictitious environments which serve as the novel's foundation.

The settings, East Egg, West Egg, and the Valley of Ashes, each play a. May 09,  · Ever since Baz Luhrmann announced that he was adapting F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby­—and especially after he revealed that he’d be doing it i. Everything you need to know about the setting of F.

Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, written by experts with you in mind more elite of the two Eggs. Despite all his money, Gatsby lives in West Egg, suggesting that he has not been able to complete his transformation into a member of the social elite.

The distance that separates him. Differences among two people often lead to negative consequences in the end. For instance, in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s, The Great Gatsby, the plot revolves around Jay Gatsby and Tom Buchanan's love for Daisy, which later results in a huge fight.

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A contrast of two settings in the great gatsby a novel by f scott fitzgerald
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