Whitman vs hughes

He Whitman vs hughes from shoemakers making shoes, masons building with stones to mechanics working with machines. In the opening to his poem, Hughes rightfully demands recognition for this part of the American song, that has been mostly demeaned and neglected.

The Power of Pairing Poems: Walt Whitman and Langston Hughes

The story the musician tells in his music is a sad one, where he wrestles with trying to be more positive and the other extreme, wishing he were dead. The use of imagery and sounds enable the poet to move the reader to two very different and distinct worlds. Both poems were written in free verse.

Posted on September 22, by Nicole Monforton Though poets of a different time in American history, Walt Whitman and Langston Hughes have something in common in terms of subject matter: Droning a drowsy syncopated tune, Rocking back and forth to a mellow croon Langston Hughes knows that America is not perfect but still stays positive.

Whitman vs Hughes

He made that poor Whitman vs hughes moan with melody Whitman includes workers of both genders, listing "the mother," "the young wife at work," and "the girl sewing or washing" in line 8. Walt Whitman is one of the first true American poets. He uses free verse. Also, Hughes along with Whitman love America.

These Americans at work are "singing what belongs to him or her and to none else," according to line 9.

Compare and contrast a Langston Hughes poem with a Walt Whitman poem.

Whitman vs hughes was no specific rhyme scheme or format. For Whitman, America is made up of individuals but who form this nation as community. In a choir, singers have their individual parts or roles that come together to form a harmonious whole. The speaker refers to being sent "to eat in the kitchen," a form of racial segregation.

He then briefly mentions "the party of young fellows" at night, presumably after work, who also sing "strong melodious songs" The black American experience, that defined by slavery, violence, dehumanization, segregation, is a part of our national identity and history, albeit one that is hard to accept.

Examples of onomatopoeia in this poem are: Before delving into the beautiful and problematic metaphor that he constructs, I want touch on two poetic devices he employs in the poem. Here, Hughes relates his suffering with that of the Poles and Greeks, demonstrating that no matter what form racism takes, the oppression is no different.

As you read the poem, you probably noticed that the poem itself is simply a list of different laborers at their work — the mechanic, the carpenter, the mason, the boatman, the deckhand, the shoemaker, the hatter, the wood-cutter, the ploughboy, the mother, the housewife, and the young girl sewing these last three I will discuss in a little bit later.

So when Whitman writes this poem stressing American unity, he is witnessing his country dividing along political lines.

There is no rhyme scheme or attempt to break lines into stanzas. He also represents and encourages the unemployed people by staying positive and that one day they, too, can unite and show people they can be just as good as them. Whitman makes a point that every human- man, woman, black, white, rich, or poor is the same thing that he, himself is- a human.

Although there are those who would deny his story and his American-ness, Hughes, through this poem, demands recognition of it. Langston Hughes Hopefully, you have had the enjoyment of reading a poem by Langston Hughes before this course.

Examples of onomatopoeia that Hughes uses are "croon," "moan," "droning," and "thump.The two poems I chose to compare and contrast are Langston Hughes' "The Weary Blues," and Walt Whitman's "Beat!

Beat! Drums!" Both use onomatopoeia, which is a literary device where a sound is. The Power of Pairing Poems: Walt Whitman and Langston Hughes March 23, by Peter Armenti The following guest post, part of our “Teacher’s Corner” series, is by Rebecca Newland, a Fairfax County Public Schools Librarian and former Teacher in Residence at the Library of Congress.

Whitman VS. Hughes Americans Perspective of free men and women. Not a worry in the world.

Whitman and Hughes: The Personal and The Universal

Explaining positive everyday activities. No slavery mentioned. Whitman and Hughes: The Personal and The Universal Posted on September 22, by Nicole Monforton Though poets of a different time in American history, Walt Whitman and Langston Hughes have something in common in terms of subject matter: intertwining the personal and universal.

Walt Whitman to Langston Hughes Comparing Two American Poems. Uploaded by. or download with email. Walt Whitman to Langston Hughes Comparing Two American Poems. Download. Walt Whitman to Langston Hughes Comparing Two American Poems With “I Hear America Singing” and “Let America Be America Again,” Walt Whitman and Langston Hughes.

Get an answer for 'Compare and contrast two poems: "I Hear America Singing" by Walt Whitman, and "I Too Sing America" by Langston Hughes.' and find homework help for other Langston Hughes.

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